Stealth Assessment, Authentic Tests

The Creative Economy is Alive and Well in Lamoille, Vermont

The Creative Economy is Alive and Well in Lamoille County, Vermont

Dibden Center for the Arts kicked off its summer season with 4 local Dance Studios presenting their end of season finales.  The Enchanted Woods Wellness Center http://enchantedwoodswellness.com/  of Morrisville, Artistic Director Alexis George Owen; Ballet Wolcott, of Wolcott, http://www.balletwolcott.com/, which is a “collaboration between three women, Helene Nilsen, Brandy Ofciarcik-Perez, and Avi Waring”; Stowe Dance Academy, http://stowedance.com/  Helena Sullivan Director;  and The Ballet School of Vermont, http://www.theballetschoolonline.com/ formerly ‘The Ballet School and Dance Arts’ with Maryellen Vickery Artistic Director.  The growth of these studios has been very exciting to watch over the last decade, with Ballet Wolcott reviving the former Wolcott Ballet which was featured in the Smithsonian Magazine in 1995 http://www.smithsonianmag.com/arts-culture/ballet-abstract.html#ixzz1PAK30uQC

Attendance for these events drew 3700 people to Johnson State College’s fabulous Dibden Center for the Arts.  Featuring around 460 dancers, and including the occasional paid professional, including recent NYC transplant Lighting Designer Jeffery Salzberg http://www.jeffsalzberg.com/ who did a great job lighting Sleeping Beauty for The Ballet School—these studios demonstrate the health and vitality of a sector that is rarely acknowledged for its financial and educational benefits to a community.  The Studio Directors push the barre higher every year.  The dedication and professionalism of the dancers is inspiring to watch.

There are really no good studies of this sector that I am aware of—but a recent study by The Ontario Arts Council http://www.spotlightfestival.ca/AssetFactory.aspx?did=2348  found tremendous health and a significant contribution to Ontario’s Creative Economy from the dance sector, engaging over 500,000 audience members and  employing over 4000 dancers  and related occupations in the region.  Of the 20 dance companies surveyed revenues accounted for $54 million in 2008.

The report “Advancing Vermont’s Creative Economy by the Vermont Council on Culture and Innovation http://www.ksefocus.com/vcci_report.pdf  offers a peek at the vitality of the creative sector in Vermont. But the stark contrast comes when you compare manufacturing declines with robust growth in the creative industries.

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There are really no good studies of this sector that I am aware of—but a recent study by The Ontario Arts Council http://www.spotlightfestival.ca/AssetFactory.aspx?did=2348  found tremendous health and a significant contribution to Ontario’s Creative Economy from the dance sector, engaging over 500,000 audience members and  employing over 4000 dancers  and related occupations in the region.  Of the 20 dance companies surveyed revenues accounted for $54 million in 2008.

The report “Advancing Vermont’s Creative Economy by the Vermont Council on Culture and Innovation http://www.ksefocus.com/vcci_report.pdf  offers a peek at the vitality of the creative sector in Vermont. But the stark contrast comes when you compare manufacturing declines with robust growth in the creative industries.

Web2.0, the Real Time Internet, Twitter and Passion Based Learning

There are 4 basic tools or platforms that everyone who wants to succeed in today’s world needs to understand and use:

1)      Twitter

2)      Hootsuite

3)      Delicious

4)      Wikis

 

What is web2.0? (from wikipedia)

The term Web 2.0 is associated with web applications that facilitate participatory information sharing, interoperability, user-centered design,[1] and collaboration on the World Wide Web. A Web 2.0 site allows users to interact and collaborate with each other in a social media dialogue as creators (prosumers) of user-generated content in a virtual community, in contrast to websites where users (consumers) are limited to the passive viewing of content that was created for them. Examples of Web 2.0 include social networking sites, blogs, wikis, video sharing sites, hosted services, web applications, mashups and folksonomies.

This is the way it works. When you set up your profile on Twitter make sure you use the key words that describe your passions: This is very important as one way people find you.

http://twitter.com/#!/jherder

·         Followers, searches, links. The importance of links and creating your media ecosystem.

·         http://blogasaurus.posterous.com

Begin to explore hashtags. What is a folksonomy? What is a taxonomy?


A folksonomy is a system of classification derived from the practice and method of collaboratively creating and managing tags to annotate and categorize content;[1][2] this practice is also known as collaborative tagging[3], social classification, social indexing, and social tagging. (from Wikipedia)


Taxonomy is the practice and science of classification. Typically this is organized by supertype-subtype relationships, also called generalization-specialization relationships, or less formally, parent-child relationships. In such an inheritance relationship, the subtype by definition has the same properties, behaviors, and constraints as the supertype plus one or more additional properties, behaviors, or constraints. (from Wikipedia)


Set up an account on Hootsuite. This is a Twitter feed manager.  Seek the key word searches that interest you.

You can link Facebook and Twitter, and manage your posts all from Hootsuite.

hootsuite: http://hootsuite.com/

A way of managing searches, twitter feeds and collaborative tweeting.

http://www.delicious.com/

Organizing your tags-searching others tags

Personal learning Network/ Personal Learning Plan

Wiki’s

#edchat

http://edchat.pbworks.com/w/page/219908/FrontPage

THA3130

http://tha3130.pbworks.com/w/page/9855286/FrontPage

#lamoillevt

http://lamoillevt.com

 

Is Web 2.0 Redefining the Arts?

The silos of disciplines tend to distort and homogenize people and ideas. The arts are no less suseptible to this. User generated content and the internet’s explosion of resources and opportunites brings me to wonder if there aren’t opportunities in what we consider the “Arts” to be. If we re envision these silos and see the blending and emergence of new forms of media as offering us the chance to by pass the limited view of a juxstapostion of these disciplines– suddenly the world looks different. What is technology? What is Dance? What is Film? What is Music?  What is visual art or Painting? They are blending. The boundaries are getting fuzzy.  Here is a young student of mine working in these new areas. Be patient with the video, its not fully revealing the effort, but it gives you the idea.

http://www.ustream.tv/recorded/13406727

So the question is this: If we blend the disciplines–espeically the Arts, we open new possiblitlities to enhance all of the disciplines. The seeds of STEM are growing in the Arts–

 

 

How Would Universal Broadband change the culture of Vermont? Micro Grids and Media

Its a big question. I am challenging myself to envision the world with 100 gigabytes download speed, here in every house in Vermont.  I see some big changes possible with education, which I started to get at in my last post.  The excitement is that with unfettered access to the internet the world’s on line repositories of knolwedge and the global brain are there to help you learn anything you want. Anything. Anytime. For example, a network of micro grids makes much more sense than a mega grid for our electricity generation, distribution and uses.  The technology and resources are there to create your own micro grid and be liberated from the constraints of the power companies. In many cases this is possible. I envision the smart grid as the web 2.0 of electricity. In other words, that user generated power is the future.  The cost of the power lost in transmission along monolithic networks are precisely the savings we can leverage to decentralize our grid.  This democratization of power is part of the paradigm shift accompanying the transition to the digital age, and a component of what it means to have ubiquitous broadband here, or anywhere for that matter.

But think about simple day to day commerce. Instead of each household going out to buy individual items, things are ordered all on line and a delivery service stops by as needed.  This makes much more sense than endless trips to the store; instead, fleets of energy efficient delivery vehicles routed through a GPS system would be making their rounds.  More people would be working from home, perhaps tending gardens or creating other localized enterprises, perhaps participating in their children’s education.  Travelling would be special, not a commute. This reduces emissions and wear and tear on the roads.

I see a dynamic between a hyperlocal intensification of  the value and understanding of location and a global connectedness that is always learning, being exposed to diversity and new ideas. The content that we create as we live our lives in our specific location is like the water beneath our feet and flowing around us. Our content is, like our water, our most precious resource. Is it being bottled and sold? Our media is as vulnerable.  Equally our participation in the emerging global web is what defines and adds value to our unique content. That dialogue with the global village is an important part of what rejuvinates our ability to be creative and innovate.

I would love to hear how you envision what effects broadband to every household in Vermont would have. The Vietnam Veterans Memorial Rest Stop Living Machine on Route I-89, Northfield, Vermont

How Would Universal Broadband change the culture of Vermont? Micro Grids and Media

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